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           Home >  Culture  > Wizard  :

The Imperial British Conservative
Party - Part 4

The Wizard Of New Zealand - 14/5/99

This is part 4 in a series of articles outlining the reasons for choosing the name of my political party the Imperial British Conservative Party. If you haven't already, read Part 1.

Those elites who monopolize power, money and status will determine which point of view is taken as “gospel”. It is obvious to anyone not blinded by greed and envy that at present in democratic societies, bankers and business men rule through puppet politicians in the name of “The People”.

Earlier, God’s consent had been guaranteed by the Church’s monopoly of writing and education and backed up by their puppets, the land owning warrior-aristocracy. Today the people’s consent is guaranteed through a combination of state monopolies of all levels of education and commercial monopolies of mass communication and is backed up by their puppets in the secular state’s monopoly of administration and coercion.

This would account for the completely irrational situation where the absolute value of economic determinism is still unquestioned in high places even though no other absolute values have survived the critiques of relativity theorists.

The pendulum has swung from one extreme to the other. Under rule by the Christian Church the spiritual world was all important. Salvation was far more important than physical health, hygiene, romantic love, freedom of movement etc. Little or no interest was taken in studying the physical world since religious intellectuals were obsessed with redemption from sin and with increasing human and agricultural fertility.

Today the industrial democracies have little or no interest in spiritual matters and even the remnants of the mainstream churches have become little more than humanistic social workers far more interested in the distribution of material goods than damnation and salvation.

Poverty, once pursued as a help towards the virtuous life, is now seen by them as the cause of crime and much effort is wasted throwing money at the poor. The poor are thereby deprived of the traditional chance to be virtuous and feel self respect despite their humble economic status. Having been deprived by the doctrine of economic determinism of any possibility of being good, they have nothing going for them at all. They are reduced to begging for handouts or forming terrorist armies.

There is no such thing as virtue in the modern state, only social justice. Truthfulness and honesty, courage and self denial, love and kindness are increasingly regarded as handicaps in the rat-race and the scramble for power, and are increasingly associated with stupidity.

The decadent and shallow lives of rock musicians, sportsmen and women, fashion models and film stars, fill the mass media which previously, in the form of paintings, mosaics, stained-glass windows and frescos, held up the lives of kings and queens, saints and prophets as the ideal. I am not claiming that the lives of such people were as pure and holy as portrayed but their function was to emphasize the importance of virtue.

Those people and organizations who use the word “environment” to refer to the material environment only, and exclude the vital psychological, social and cultural components of the environment, are crass materialists and any solution they offer is likely to make things worse.

Many people have vested interests in maintaining the present civilization which rewards people in commerce (and the secular intellectuals who support the ideology of economic determinism) with power, money and status. It is an interesting exercise to consider those groups who have lost power, money and/or status as the result of the ideology of economic determinism. They are the most likely to lead any movement for change.

The landed gentry lost almost all of their power and status in the industrial revolution. The importance of their extended families and life-long responsibility for the welfare of their tenants, who have lived on their land for generations, are at odds with payment based solely on hours of work and the belief that the state should provide for everyone’s welfare and retirement.

Their engrained ‘stewardship’ attitude to the land as something that should be passed on to their descendants, not as private property that can be sold to the highest bidder, gives them an identity which is completely at odds with the ideology of the market place.

In the marketplace everything becomes a commodity and all workers become wage slaves who can be fired without compunction. Since the poor, who have no material possessions to provide them with materialistic status, depend on the state for the bread on their plates, they are bound to feel resentful about their vulnerability.

This resentment leads to outbreaks of fanatical envy given a moral disguise in the form of political action from socialist and fascist nationalism to religious fundamentalism. Their leaders are often not themselves under-privileged, but simply hungry for power.

Contradictory as it may seem, true conservatism is the most radical form of politics in the world today. True radicals speak out and upset the ruling elites and since all of these are today economic determinists anyone who even raises the idea of adopting policies involving other values and different ruling elites is likely to be ridiculed or demonised in the media, deprived of any employment which might provide opportunities for communicating such a viewpoint and in extreme cases treated as insane.

Ibsen’s play “Enemy of the People” and Orwell’s novel “1984”, show some of the pressures put upon real radicals and the treatment of dissidents in socialist states shows the extremes to which governments will go in this century which has been much more intolerant than the Spanish Inquisition at its worst.

People “full of passionate intensity” hate all hierarchies, except their own (whose existence they conveniently deny). No social life, indeed no life at all, is possible without hierarchical organization. It is the very fabric of the universe.

There are of course good or bad social hierarchies depending on how open they are and the characters of those who exercise power at the top.

I am recommending that the present meritocratic hierarchy based on achievement as measured by secular government or commercial agencies be replaced by a hierarchy based on three principles combined. These are practical ability ( a record of previous success), virtue (meaning in particular a record of honesty, kindness and consideration for others) and charm (charisma of a non-serious kind since serious charisma is usually based on fear and may lead to acts of great cruelty for some hypothetical greater good).

Position in various social hierarchies always brings honour and respect and people with these three abilities would be less likely to betray that respect than those people selected by the present system.

I have probably tried to cover too much ground in this article but I will sum up in the hope that the development of the ideas follows a logical sequence.

Firstly I compared a conservative philosophy of life with the present world obsession with economic determinism. I pointed out that most of the green parties are made up of economic determinists of the socialist variety whose obsession with power is even more destructive than the greed associated with the capitalists they both hate and imitate.

Then I looked back to the transition from earlier stable agricultural economies, which were ruled by spiritual elites, to the ruling elites of the industrial world who, as a consequence of their obsessional concern with the purely material values of health and wealth, have destabilized all institutions including the most basic of all, the human family.

The consequent growth of personal stress and social violence is only part of the price paid for such an obsession with physical health and wealth, moreover the material environment is unable to take the strain imposed upon it and ecological catastrophes are fast approaching.

The urgent task facing any political organization concerned with more than power or money is the revaluation of all values. To turn away from individualistic alienation and obsession with physical health and material wealth and towards mental health and relocation in playful and colourful hierarchies of honour and cultural meaning.

Seeing the universe as an hierarchically ordered “great chain of being” is the only way to prevent the “flattening” effect produced by the scientific world view which can only comprehend the tangible and material. In the early 1970s, with help from colleagues, I created a ‘postmodern’ cosmology designed to fulfill this function as a preliminary step to founding the Imperial British Conservative Party. Who else has given so much thought to laying the foundations of a truly radical and truly conservative political Party?

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